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Etodolac

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IMPORTANT WARNING
People who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as etodolac may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not take these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke, if you smoke, and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of the body, or slurred speech. [More...]
Why is this medication prescribed?
Etodolac tablets, capsules, and extended-release (long-acting) tablets are used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints). Etodolac tablets and capsules are also used to relieve pain from other causes. Etodolac is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. It works by stopping the body's production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation.

How should this medicine be used?
Etodolac comes as a tablet, a capsule, and an extended-release tablet to take by mouth. To treat arthritis, the tablet and capsule are usually taken two to three times a day and the extended-release tablet is usually taken once a day. To relieve pain from other causes, the tablets and capsules are usually taken every 6 to 8 hours. Take etodolac at around the same time(s) every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take etodolac exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the extended-release tablets whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

If you are taking etodolac for arthritis, your doctor may start you on a high dose and decrease your dose once your symptoms are controlled. It may take 1 to 2 weeks for you to feel the full benefit of this medication.

Other uses for this medicine
This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?
Before taking etodolac,
What special dietary instructions should I follow?
Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What should I do if I forget a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?
Etodolac may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, or those mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately. Do not take any more etodolac until you speak to your doctor. Etodolac may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?
Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Do not prepare doses of etodolac tablets in advance; keep the tablets in the original container until you are ready to take them. Store etodolac at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose
In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include:
What other information should I know?
Before having any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are taking etodolac.

If you have diabetes and you test your urine for ketones, you should know that etodolac may interfere with the results of this type of test. Talk to your doctor about how you should monitor your diabetes while you are taking etodolac.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

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09/01/2010
© 2014. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc.
ASHP
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